Books You Need To Read Part 2

Books You Need To Read Part 2

By now, you have probably noticed that I tend to read a lot, and all that reading means that I have gone through quite a few books. But, as every reader will know, there are usually only a select few that stand out to us enough to recommend. So here we are again with yet another roundup of the books I have read recently. You can find some more recommendations from my last post here. Let me know if you have read any of these or are planning to read them!

1)      The Hating Game by Sally Thorne

Are you in the mood for a good rom-com? Are office enemies one of your favourite tropes? Do you love reading witty and quick banter? The Hating Game by Sally Thorne centers around the epic enemy/friendship situation between Lucy Hutton and Joshua Templeman in an office setting. With an abundance of witty banter, not-so-charming and some much-needed hard-hitting realizations, this book is a must-read for all those who love a good rom-com.

2)      The Jane Austen Society by Natalie Jenner

I love Jane Austen just as much as the next person, but I think I love the world she created even more – and of course, the readers who interact with it. The Jane Austen Society follows a group of people who have been brought together for their love of Jane Austen. Coming from all different backgrounds, who would never normally cross each other, they come together to save Jane Austen’s legacy and preserve it for generations to come. If you are in the mood for a good comfort read, then you should pick this book up. Make sure to prepare yourself a cup of tea while you read this book on a rainy day.

3)      Take Me Home Tonight by Morgan Matson

Morgan Matson is one of my favourite YA authors so naturally, I had to pick up this book the week it came out. Take Me Home Tonight centers around two inseparable best friends, who get separated one night in New York City and set off on their adventures for the first time. The story explores growing up, change and figuring out that what you want might change and that is okay. I love Morgan Matson and truly wish I could live the adventures her characters go through, just because it’s YA doesn’t mean there isn’t something for everyone. Take a fun and crazy overnight trip to New York City and allow yourself to be swept away by the adventure of it all.

4)      Sparks Like Stars by Nadia Hashimi

Sparks Like Stars centers around a young girl who sees her entire family killed in Afghanistan during the Soviet invasion. Her entire world as she knows it is completely taken away from her, but one guard sneaks her off to the home of a US embassy employee. Their goal is to get her to America as quickly as possible without being seen, for fear that she might not be safe. Throughout the book, we learn about the trauma she endures, the effects of harsh realities hitting her at such a young age and what it means to grieve the loss of your loved ones. Sparks Like Stars has to be one of the most heartbreaking but necessary reads for everyone and anyone. The resilience, grit and determination that the main character shows are admirable and tremendously terrifying. Ultimately, the reality of so many children caught in the middle of a war they didn’t create. It is simply a must-read for everyone.

If you need a few more recommendations, here are some books I am planning on buying for Summer 2021:

– That Summer by Jennifer Weiner

– People we meet on vacation by Emily Henry

– Meet you in the middle by Devon Daniels

– Siege & Storm by Leigh Bardugo

Books You Need To Read

Books You Need To Read

I have loved reading for many years, but I must admit as a kid I hated reading. But now, it seems that I have to make up for lost time, which means I am constantly reading a book. Here are a few of my recent favourites that I would highly recommend you all take a look at.


1) The Midnight Library by Matt Haig
The book follows the story of Nora Seed who decides that she does not want to live anymore. After attempting to take her own life, she ends up in a unique place known as the Midnight Library – or the in-between of life and death. Here, along with the help of an old friend, she will get the chance to see what her life could have been if she had made different choices.
I was a bit hesitant to start this book, but I honestly have no idea why I waited so long, it was a fantastic book. Haig writes so beautifully and explains philosophical concepts of the universe in a simple, yet intriguing way. I would recommend this book to anyone who is a lover of philosophy, abstract thinking, a good story, or who needs a dose of inspiration.


2) Next Year in Havana by Chanel Cleeton
Next Year in Havana is the story of Marisol Ferrera who returns to Cuba in 2017, at the request of her now-deceased grandmother to spread her ashes in Cuba. Elisa Perez, Marisol’s grandmother, fled Cuba in 1958 at the age of 19 years old during the Cuban revolution. Both women’s stories give us a glimpse into understanding a time in history that we might have never learned about. This book has it all – the romance, history, excellent plot and just how tumultuous our family lives can be. If you are a history junkie, or just want to learn a little bit about the Cuban Revolution, then this might be a good place to start.
I did not know I would love this book so much, but the story and writing are crafted so well that you will not be able to put it down once you start.


3) The Flatshare by Beth O’Leary.
The book follows the story of Tiffy and Leon who become sort of roommates. Leon needs money to pay for his brother’s legal fees after he was wrongly accused of a crime and sent to prison, and Tiffy needs to get away from her ex-boyfriend as fast as possible. They go on to become roommates – but not your typical roommates. Leon works nights so he only uses the apartment during the day, while Tiffy works during the day and only uses the apartment at night. One would assume they would have no contact, but through a string of intricate post-it notes, their lives become intertwined with one another and they can’t seem to stay away from one another.
One of my favourite things about this book is how it addresses unhealthy, toxic and abusive relationships and the people that unfortunately are in them. As you will read, Tiffy was in an abusive relationship with her ex-boyfriend, but Beth O’Leary focused on empowering Tiffy and having her find the strength within to break away from it. Of course, she had her support system, but it was refreshing to read the main character find the strength within herself instead of finding that in others.

I truly love to read, and I love how easily we can be transported to a world none of us have ever known. If you too are a reader or want to become one, check out my other post for some more book ideas.
Happy Reading!